Serionix Receives NASA Phase II Award

Serionix recently received a $750,000 contract from NASA to fund continued development of filters to remove toxic gases from next-generation spacesuit life support systems.

Serionix creates high-performance filters based on a proprietary adsorptive coating technology called Colorfil™, which changes colors as it removes toxic chemicals and odors from air, while killing viruses, bacteria, and mold. Through an intuitive, vibrant color change, Colorfil™ lets users know when the filters are working and when they aren’t.

NASA’s next generation of spacesuit and Personal Life Support System (PLSS) demands ultra-high performance filtration to remove toxic chemicals that include ammonia and formaldehyde. The PLSS is used during extra-vehicular activities to keep astronauts safe, healthy, and comfortable. Because of the unique demands of spaceflight applications, every component of the PLSS must be as small, lightweight, and robust as possible. Enter Serionix and the color-changing air filters they have demonstrated now in applications ranging from pet- and cooking-odor removal to semiconductor chip manufacturing.

“We are excited for the opportunity to work with NASA to send our Colorfil technology into space,” James Langer, Serionix’s President, said.

“What’s truly exciting, however, is how the funding will indirectly support launch of consumer products based on the same core technology,” Langer continued. “For the most part, consumers today have almost no visibility on what filters actually do for them—making purchasing decisions difficult, and making it nearly impossible to determine when it’s time for replacement. With Colorfil, we are looking to change that.”

The first phase of Serionix’s project with NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) program began in June of 2016, and overlapped with the successful beta launch of their Colorfil™ air purifier and HVAC filters. In this second phase, Serionix will develop a demonstration unit suitable for incorporation into NASA’s spacesuit life support system. In the meantime, they will leverage partnerships with leading industrial players to launch products in residential, automotive, commercial, and high-end industrial applications.

Do You Understand Filter Expiration?

Whether we notice them or (more likely) not, air filters are all around us–in our cars, homes, offices, and many more applications. When they are working correctly, air filters serve to protect people, pets, processes, and equipment (think engines) from all of the crud that floats around. The trouble is, air filters are almost always out of sight, and as such out of mind. Consequently, it’s often hard for users to pin down the purpose of air filters, much less understand the importance of timely replacement.

Looking at just one application, when our beta customers were asked why and how often they change their furnace (HVAC) filters, the overwhelming majority stated they changed it because “they’re supposed to” and admitted they probably don’t change it enough.

These responses echo results from a survey we conducted last year, which probed 82 respondents’ understanding of why filter replacement is important. The answers fell into categories such as air cleanliness, energy efficiency, cleanliness and energy efficiency, or fire hazard. Of the respondents, 63% indicated they understood dirty filters could impact the efficiency of their furnace. However, digging a bit deeper there is some ambiguity regarding whether the key issue is energy efficiency, filtration efficiency, or damage to the AC unit or furnace itself. As it happens, each represent important reasons for regularly replacing an HVAC filter.

More specifically, what then are the benefits of proper use and replacement of air filters?

  • Clean air! Reducing the levels of annoying, irritating, or even downright dangerous contaminants in your air;
  • Saving energy! Reductions in total costs of heating and cooling up to 5-15% (source);
  • Protecting your HVAC system from premature failure (low airflow can cause heat exchangers to crack and condensation build up)

Serionix’s Colorfil™ filters remove harmful contaminants such as toxic chemicals and odors from your air, and change color to indicate expiration, eliminating the ambiguity in air filter replacement. You will know exactly when your filter needs a change without the guesswork. Fresh, clean, safe air. Peace of mind. That’s Colorfil™. (source)

Want to try one today?

Serionix Visits UIUC Small Animal Clinic

The Serionix team recently visited the University of Illinois Small Animal Clinic in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. We were ecstatic receiving a tour and discussing the possibilities of working together to research our technology and the potential benefits for similar veterinary clinics.

Application of our technology could eliminate that “pet smell” we know so fondly when we enter an animal shelter or pet store. This could increase sales of larger pets, as well as improve the quality of life for the animals by providing a clean living environment.

Our technology may also mitigate the transmission of diseases, such as seoul virus, between animals and humans. Rats affected with seoul virus do not show any immediate symptoms and it can take up to 8 weeks to cause symptoms in humans. More information on seoul virus in rats can be found at Veterinary Bytes under Alerts for Pet Parents.

The Chemistry of Smell

We all learned about our five senses in grade school—sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. And as we got older, we learned more about what actually causes these senses to be activated. When light bounces off of an object, our eyes receive that light and we call it sight. When vibrations travel through the air, our eardrums vibrate too and our brain interprets the sound. Touch and taste are equally straightforward; when we brush up against something or put food in our mouth we touch and we taste. But what causes smells? We could just say aromas are in the air. But what is it that actually triggers our brain to recognize a scent?

The answer is small molecules and a little bit of chemistry.

Olfaction, A.K.A. Smell

The scientific word for smell is olfaction, and this process is facilitated by the olfactory system. You’ve probably noticed that “olfact-” is code for “has to do with smell;” we’ll keep using this code word as we talk about what triggers our sense of smell.

In any case, there are a lot of parts to the olfactory system. The most interesting of these parts are the olfactory receptors. These receptors are part of specialized brain cells that span from your nasal cavity, across your olfactory epithelium (a type of skin), and directly to your brain. Humans have about 12 million of these receptors while animals known for their sense of smell—like dogs—have 1 billion or more.

Courtesy of Rice University

These olfactory receptors are what receive smells and allow your brain to interpret them. But, this still doesn’t answer the question of what actually causes smells.

Small Molecules, Big Smells

When we sense a smell in the air, we’re actually sensing the presence of small, vaporized molecules. So, when you smell a flower, baking bread, or your smelly gym socks, you’re actually sensing molecules that have evaporated from the surface of those objects. These molecules move through the air and into your nose. Then, they bind with a specific set of olfactory receptors and generate a signal in your brain, triggering you to recognize that specific smell.

Courtesy of eSchoolToday

Not all materials can vaporize easily. That’s why materials like metal tend not to have a strong smell. There are also some molecules that humans don’t have odor receptors for. Gases like carbon monoxide and natural gas are odorless not because they’re not vapors, but because we simply don’t have the receptors to smell them.

All Molecules Are Not Created Equal

Not surprisingly, there are many, many different kinds of odor-causing molecules. There are also about 340 different types of odor receptors in humans that work together in different combinations to identify specific smells. Even in your home, there can be many different odor-causing molecules floating around. However, there are a few key molecules that when filtered out of your air can greatly improve your indoor air quality.

Ammonia

Ammonia and ammonia-related compounds have a characteristic, pungent smell. And in large quantities ammonia can be dangerous. But in homes, this gas often comes from a variety of minor sources and is an annoyance rather than a danger. Ammonia can come from cleaners, cat urine, older refrigerators, and fertilizers used near your home.

Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde levels in homes are typically low, but the smell of formaldehyde can be noticeable even at these low levels. This gas makes its way into homes through particleboard and plywood, cigarette smoke, and some dyes and preservatives. It is also a main ingredient in some insulation found in homes from the 1970s and 1980s.

Sulfur Compounds

Sulfur compounds, specifically hydrogen sulfide, are responsible for rotten egg smells in your home. If you’ve ever lived in a home that used well water you’re probably very familiar with this smell. While hydrogen sulfide is not dangerous at low levels—and the human nose can detect very low levels of this gas—it’s definitely a nuisance.

Homeowners have options when it comes to eliminating smells in their homes. Candles and air fresheners are often the first line of defense against home odors. But, now that we know that odors are actually caused by certain molecules in the air, there are some better options.

Rather than cover up odors the best option is to eliminate odor-causing molecules altogether. The easiest way to do this is to simply add odor-molecule trapping capabilities to the filters you already use in your home. Serionix manufactures filters like this, made to fit easily into your home furnace system. These filters were originally designed for cleanrooms and are incredibly effective at removing airborne chemicals. Using a filter like this gives you the cleanest possible air for your home!

Sources

1. http://www.rsc.org/education/eic/issues/2009March/smell-chemical-molecule-receptor-shape.asp
2. https://cnx.org/contents/5nOdwC6i@5/Taste-and-Smell
3. http://www.ehow.com/info_8783314_could-cause-smell-ammonia-home.html
4. http://www.idph.state.il.us/envhealth/factsheets/formaldehyde.htm
5. http://www.ehso.com/ehshome/hydrogensulfide.htm

Why a House That Smells Won’t Sell

The sense of smell brings back strong memories. These memories may be of a certain flower from childhood or the perfume your grandmother used to wear. Whatever these memories may be, smell is inherently linked to our brains.

So why is smell so important in selling a home? Research suggests that one of the first impressions someone has walking into your home may be of the smell. Maybe they get a whiff of your cat’s litter box or the Indian curry you were cooking last night. Overpowering smells make a home difficult to sell, according to Eric Spangenberg, Dean of the College of Business at Washington State University who has extensively studied the science of smell on consumer behavior.

Realtors suggest a few simple methods to reduce or eliminate the smell in your home.

  1. Clean your home thoroughly, but not with cleaning products that leave strong odors such as bleach. Lightly scented cleaners are best–and if possible, use organic smells such as lemon or orange to give a hint of scent.
  2. Roast coffee beans in the oven.
  3. Boil a pot of water with lemon or orange peels, to give a hint of organic smell.
  4. If you love to bake, avoid chocolate chip cookies prior to an open house. Instead, opt for baking something such as cinnamon rolls which leave the scent of cinnamon instead of the heavy scent of chocolate.

A more permanent solution to your smell problem may be found in Serionix filters. Our revolutionary color changing filters have been proven to eliminate odors that come from pets, especially cat litter odors, and cooking odors. Whether or not you are selling your home, having a clean smelling home may increase your confidence in having guests over and your overall satisfaction with your home.

Serionix has both portable air purifier units and furnace filters available. We are in the process of beginning our beta trial and looking for customers interested in testing out our product. Got a house that smells? We can help. Sign up here to test our product.

 

Sources: http://www.homesandland.com/real-tips/smell-can-help-sell-your-home/

http://www.fifthsense.org.uk/psychology-and-smell/

http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/How-to-get-rid-of-cooking-smell-while-selling-your-home/352355/

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