Serionix Receives NASA Phase II Award

Serionix recently received a $750,000 contract from NASA to fund continued development of filters to remove toxic gases from next-generation spacesuit life support systems.

Serionix creates high-performance filters based on a proprietary adsorptive coating technology called Colorfil™, which changes colors as it removes toxic chemicals and odors from air, while killing viruses, bacteria, and mold. Through an intuitive, vibrant color change, Colorfil™ lets users know when the filters are working and when they aren’t.

NASA’s next generation of spacesuit and Personal Life Support System (PLSS) demands ultra-high performance filtration to remove toxic chemicals that include ammonia and formaldehyde. The PLSS is used during extra-vehicular activities to keep astronauts safe, healthy, and comfortable. Because of the unique demands of spaceflight applications, every component of the PLSS must be as small, lightweight, and robust as possible. Enter Serionix and the color-changing air filters they have demonstrated now in applications ranging from pet- and cooking-odor removal to semiconductor chip manufacturing.

“We are excited for the opportunity to work with NASA to send our Colorfil technology into space,” James Langer, Serionix’s President, said.

“What’s truly exciting, however, is how the funding will indirectly support launch of consumer products based on the same core technology,” Langer continued. “For the most part, consumers today have almost no visibility on what filters actually do for them—making purchasing decisions difficult, and making it nearly impossible to determine when it’s time for replacement. With Colorfil, we are looking to change that.”

The first phase of Serionix’s project with NASA SBIR (Small Business Innovation Research) program began in June of 2016, and overlapped with the successful beta launch of their Colorfil™ air purifier and HVAC filters. In this second phase, Serionix will develop a demonstration unit suitable for incorporation into NASA’s spacesuit life support system. In the meantime, they will leverage partnerships with leading industrial players to launch products in residential, automotive, commercial, and high-end industrial applications.

Why a House That Smells Won’t Sell

The sense of smell brings back strong memories. These memories may be of a certain flower from childhood or the perfume your grandmother used to wear. Whatever these memories may be, smell is inherently linked to our brains.

So why is smell so important in selling a home? Research suggests that one of the first impressions someone has walking into your home may be of the smell. Maybe they get a whiff of your cat’s litter box or the Indian curry you were cooking last night. Overpowering smells make a home difficult to sell, according to Eric Spangenberg, Dean of the College of Business at Washington State University who has extensively studied the science of smell on consumer behavior.

Realtors suggest a few simple methods to reduce or eliminate the smell in your home.

  1. Clean your home thoroughly, but not with cleaning products that leave strong odors such as bleach. Lightly scented cleaners are best–and if possible, use organic smells such as lemon or orange to give a hint of scent.
  2. Roast coffee beans in the oven.
  3. Boil a pot of water with lemon or orange peels, to give a hint of organic smell.
  4. If you love to bake, avoid chocolate chip cookies prior to an open house. Instead, opt for baking something such as cinnamon rolls which leave the scent of cinnamon instead of the heavy scent of chocolate.

A more permanent solution to your smell problem may be found in Serionix filters. Our revolutionary color changing filters have been proven to eliminate odors that come from pets, especially cat litter odors, and cooking odors. Whether or not you are selling your home, having a clean smelling home may increase your confidence in having guests over and your overall satisfaction with your home.

Serionix has both portable air purifier units and furnace filters available. We are in the process of beginning our beta trial and looking for customers interested in testing out our product. Got a house that smells? We can help. Sign up here to test our product.

 

Sources: http://www.homesandland.com/real-tips/smell-can-help-sell-your-home/

http://www.fifthsense.org.uk/psychology-and-smell/

http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/How-to-get-rid-of-cooking-smell-while-selling-your-home/352355/

Serionix Wins Cozad Competition

Story courtesy of News Gazette’s Don Dodson.

CHAMPAIGN — Serionix took the top monetary prize at the Cozad New Venture Competition this past weekend.

The company — which has come up with filter materials to remove perchlorate from drinking water — took first place in the Most Fundable Venture category, earning the firm $15,000.

Jim Langer, the firm’s president, said he hopes to use the winnings for intellectual property development, such as filing patent applications, or business development, such as meeting with customers on the West Coast.

Langer said Serionix started a year ago as a result of taking part in the 2011 Cozad competition. But last year, the firm didn’t make the finals.

“That served as motivation for us to work hard, and the results this year indicate it paid off,” he said.

Before taking part in last year’s competition, “we had no clear direction of what we really wanted to do, but as a result of the competition, and exposure to and connection with mentors, we were able to craft pieces for what ultimately became the company,” he said. “Cozad was the spark that set it off.”

Serionix recently won the Student Startup Award at Champaign County’s Innovation Celebration and was a finalist for the Lemelson-MIT Illinois Student Prize.

Photo By: The News Gazette
Jim Langer, left, and Weihua Zheng of Serionix, which has developed ion-exchange fiber composite materials to help remove perchlorate from drinking water.

Other monetary winners at this year’s Cozad competition included:

— GlucoSentient, which won a $10,000 prize as the Burrill Best Digital Healthcare Application. GlucoSentient aims to improve the lives of patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who take theophylline. It proposes home monitoring through use of a blood glucose meter.

— Transplants Without Donors, which won a $7,500 prize as Best Social Venture. That team invented a life-saving therapy based on the creation of artificial organs from the patients’ stem cells and biomaterials.

— HigherMed, which won a $5,000 prize for second place in the Most Fundable Venture category. That team plans to develop and market an easier-to-use prescription pill bottle cap, primarily for people with decreased dexterity.

— Oso Simple Technologies and Prawg each won a $2,500 prize for Best Mobile Application. Oso Simple aims to reduce the water used on lawns and gardens, while Prawg focuses on real-time interaction between TV shows and their audiences. Prawg also won a $1,000 prize for Most Patentable Idea/Venture.

— StudyCloud won a $2,000 prize for third place in the Most Fundable Venture category. StudyCloud is an online collaboration platform poised at integrating social web technology with online education.

Twenty teams took part in the competition’s semifinals, and nine advanced to Saturday’s finals, held at the UI’s Business Instructional Facility.

The finalists were: Easy Go Dispenser, EscaWheel, GlucoSentient, HigherMed, OceanComm, Serionix, StudyCloud, Transplants Without Donors and uZee.

The annual competition is named for V. Dale Cozad, founder of Cozad Asset Management. The program was established through an endowment from Peter and Kim Fox and is administered through the UI’s Technology Entrepreneur Center.

Scroll Up